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TPI-PRO-DVI recommendations?

gregrgregr Junior MemberPosts: 54
Thinking about a H.O.W. video presentation system where the presentation PC is displayed and controlled on the touch monitor thru one window of a TPI-PRO-DVI-2. The 2nd window would display the preview output of the presentation switcher. Of course, since the TPI-PRO acts as a native TP, it would control the switcher and peripherals as well. This would reduce the monitor/screen count to one, instead of the usual 3 or more.

Any experience with this unit on similar projects, or at all? A quick search for it here shows no results.

Complete madness or normal application for this device?

Thanks

Comments

  • rfletcherrfletcher Junior Member Posts: 217
    I've never actually used one in quite that way, but I've thought about it a couple of times. I don't see any reason off the top of my head that that wouldn't work as long as it fits how the end user wants to use the room.
  • Andrew G WelkerAndrew G Welker Junior Member Posts: 124
    One thing to watch out for with the TPI-DVI-PRO is that it is NOT HDCP compliant. This means that if the computer is a Windows 8/8.1/Mac and is hooked up to an HDCP capable switcher that does not allow you to turn HDCP off, or there is a Blu-ray player in the system, then the TPI will not display a signal.
  • ericmedleyericmedley Senior Member - 4000+ posts Posts: 4,177
    One thing to watch out for with the TPI-DVI-PRO is that it is NOT HDCP compliant. This means that if the computer is a Windows 8/8.1/Mac and is hooked up to an HDCP capable switcher that does not allow you to turn HDCP off, or there is a Blu-ray player in the system, then the TPI will not display a signal.

    In other words: Don't use this box. It will only end in tears.
  • gregrgregr Junior Member Posts: 54
    One thing to watch out for with the TPI-DVI-PRO is that it is NOT HDCP compliant. This means that if the computer is a Windows 8/8.1/Mac and is hooked up to an HDCP capable switcher that does not allow you to turn HDCP off, or there is a Blu-ray player in the system, then the TPI will not display a signal.

    wow, thanks for bringing that up, Andrew. I should have learned my lesson with the one DVX-2100 I used.

    So does Win 8 need HDCP compliance on the output in order to display anything, or just protected content?
  • gregrgregr Junior Member Posts: 54
    ericmedley wrote: »
    In other words: Don't use this box. It will only end in tears.

    Thanks for the direct advice, Andrew. I try to avoid tears on my projects, especially in front of clients.
  • Andrew G WelkerAndrew G Welker Junior Member Posts: 124
    gregr wrote: »
    wow, thanks for bringing that up, Andrew. I should have learned my lesson with the one DVX-2100 I used.

    So does Win 8 need HDCP compliance on the output in order to display anything, or just protected content?

    What I have determined is that Windows 8 and the latest Apple OS's, both iOS and MacOS, there is a communication that happens where the source says "Hey, are you HDCP capable?" and the sink (display, switcher, TPI), says yes or no. If it says "Yes," HDCP gets turned on. If it says "No," HDCP stays off.

    In other words, if the PC (Mac or Windows) can turn HDCP on, it will. If it can't, it won't, and protected content just won't display.

    I hope that helps...
  • rynandorynando Junior Member Posts: 68
    There are ways around this HDCP issue of course. If you really need this functionality, you can have it.
  • nickmnickm Blinky Light Aficionado Posts: 152
    I've worked on quite a few projects that include TPI-PRO-DVIs. They are both a blessing and a curse. They are extremely versatile in what they are capable of, but at the same time, have a LOT of gotchas. Here are some that I've come across in my experience with them:

    -The most obvious one that I failed to consider the first time I used one is that your touch panel resolution has to match your desired display output resolution. The TPI will not independently scale the 2 outputs. Obvious to some, but not clearly documented.

    -You cannot have a truly full-screen video button. If I were to draw a button from 0,0 of the top left corner to the bottom right corner (typically 1920,1200), the video goes blank. Solution is to start at 1,1 and leave a 1x1 buffer at the bottom right corner.

    -Outside of video layer 1, you cannot place opaque graphics on top of video buttons. This will result in the corresponding area being blacked out on the second output (when the second output has the control layer turned off). Any popup page or button that can possibly cover a video-filled button, I typically set for an Overall Opacity of 240.

    -They are slow. Don't get carried away with highly detailed graphics for your touch panel pages. These units are pretty slow to redraw.

    If you have any specific questions, I'm happy to answer them.
  • rfletcherrfletcher Junior Member Posts: 217
    nickm wrote: »
    -You cannot have a truly full-screen video button. If I were to draw a button from 0,0 of the top left corner to the bottom right corner (typically 1920,1200), the video goes blank. Solution is to start at 1,1 and leave a 1x1 buffer at the bottom right corner.

    You can however make the page background a full screen video window.
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