G4 Panel Builder

Spire_JeffSpire_Jeff Formerly Caffeinated ProgrammerPosts: 1,917
Does anyone use this on a regular basis and how much has it helped you? I am currently thinking about revisiting this program for a second try and I want to make sure I give it a fair shake. To unleash its full potential, do I need to create my own templates? Any other pros or cons that I should be aware of?

Jeff

Comments

  • Spire_JeffSpire_Jeff Formerly Caffeinated Programmer Posts: 1,917
    I have been playing around with Panelbuilder for a few and I am wondering if there is any way to have panelbuilder assign port, address and channel codes? Or, even just channel and address codes, so I don't have to risk clicking the buttons in the wrong order or miss typing the codes.
  • DHawthorneDHawthorne Junior Member Posts: 4,584
    I've used twice I think. In both cases, it was to generate a template with the downloadable graphics that I have since used and re-used, after making the basic structure confrm to the way I wanted it. I won't use it again until I want a panel with a different graphics set.

    I don't believe there is a way to have the panel builder set codes, and if there is, I never saw it as an option.
  • jjamesjjames AMX Sustaining Engineer Posts: 2,898
    Spire_Jeff wrote:
    I have been playing around with Panelbuilder for a few and I am wondering if there is any way to have panelbuilder assign port, address and channel codes? Or, even just channel and address codes, so I don't have to risk clicking the buttons in the wrong order or miss typing the codes.
    There sure is. First, you'll need to edit the template files. In TPD4, click on File,then Import G4 PanelBuilder Template . . .. Navigate to C:\Program Files\Common Files\AMXShare\G4Templates\. Open up whichever template you plan on using, and start changing all the channels, etc. Once you're finished, click on File, then on Export As G4 PanelBuilder Template and replace that template you just edited. Once that's done, you're free to use PanelBuilder and when you export to a TP4 file, you'll see that the codes are in there.
  • Spire_JeffSpire_Jeff Formerly Caffeinated Programmer Posts: 1,917
    As I work with this more, I am starting to remember why I didn't use it to begin with. It seems that I am fighting the program more than it helps me. I do like the fact that someone has a complete layout for most of the devices I need. I don't like that I have to link all of the devices and pages. Most of my touchpanels have the page flips driven by the processor, not the panel. I think I will probably wind up using the program like Dave.... just a way to use some of the graphics schemes provided by AMX. Thanks for all of the input.

    Jeff
  • champchamp Junior Member Posts: 261
    Same here

    It's good to create a base to work with but you need to spend hours to days customising the result, so a static template file is just as useful.

    It would be great if you could put some permanently available buttons on it like power, volume and lighting.

    These wizard programs come out promising the world, making the boss and all sales staff believe it will only take 10 minutes to do an entire panel.

    I pity the customer with the industrial steel design on their panel!
  • jjamesjjames AMX Sustaining Engineer Posts: 2,898
    I feel the real power behind PanelBuilder is the ability to edit and create templates, and as shown assigning channels, ports, etc. You dont' have to connect all the dots in G4PB, it just gives you a warning that the navigation isn't complete.

    By tweaking the templates, you could really rock with G4PB, and it could take you about thirty minutes to an hour to do a complete panel. Sure the initial tweaking wouldn't take you this long, but after you spend a day tweaking the template how you want it (or any template that you've made) G4PB seems to have the potential to really save you time and money in creating touch panels.

    Just my opinion . . .
  • Spire_JeffSpire_Jeff Formerly Caffeinated Programmer Posts: 1,917
    Maybe I'm missing something, but I was thinking along these lines: Wouldn't it be just as effective to simply create a complete panel in TPD4 and save it as your template. Then when you need it, just open the file, save as a new file, then delete the pages/popups you don't need? In essense, that is almost what is being done through PB assuming you don't use page flips on the buttons.

    Jeff
  • jjamesjjames AMX Sustaining Engineer Posts: 2,898
    What you're saying is essentially the same thing that I was saying. You can use G4PB without connecting the nodes and make the channels in the template for your page flips, etc. Either way would work.
  • Chip MoodyChip Moody Junior Member Posts: 727
    The current "Template" I've been using for projects is a melding of elements from digital dots and crimson curves. I used PB to make TPD4 files from each of the PB templates, opened both in TPD4 and made my hybrid, then saved that as my template for projects. While there are still tweaks/changes made from one system to the next based on project/client desires, the basic result is something along the lines of the attached picture.

    - Chip
  • champchamp Junior Member Posts: 261
    I like bluesteel for MVP panels and Earthtone curves for the big panels.
    I've had to modify them of course.
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